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Arrival of Monsoon Signals Easing of Fire Restrictions
in Southeast Arizona Including Madera Canyon

Effective Friday, July 11, the Bureau of Land Management Gila District, all districts of the Coronado National Forest, Saguaro National Park, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Coronado National Memorial, Chiricahua National Monument, Fort Bowie National Historic Site, Tumacácori National Historical Park, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, and the Arizona State Forestry Division will lift all fire restrictions in southeastern Arizona. Due to widespread precipitation across the area, additional rain in the weather forecast, increased relative humidity, and a rise in moisture in live and dead trees, brush, and grass, it has been determined that the likelihood of wildfire has lessened to the degree that the restrictions can be rescinded.

Visitors are reminded to always practice fire safety. One less spark means one less wildfire.

  • Before going hiking or camping, check with public land management agencies for fire regulations, restrictions or area closures.
  • Metal fire rings or grills should be used where present. Wood placed on a fire should never exceed the size of the grill or fire ring.
  • If building a fire on the ground (in areas where permitted), a location should be selected which is away from adjoining or overhanging flammable material, and the ground beneath and around the fire should be cleared of all flammable materials.
  • On windy days fires should be avoided if possible.
  • If you have a campfire, make sure it is fully extinguished before leaving the area. Fires should be doused with water and dirt and stirred with a shovel until completely cold to the touch.
  • If you are using a portable stove, make sure the area is clear of grass, pine needles, leaves, and other fine fuels. Prevent stoves from tipping and starting a fire.
  • Cigarettes should never be thrown out the window of a vehicle.
  • Always use an ashtray to prevent wildfires.
  • Practice Leave No Trace principles - pack out cigarette butts and burned materials from your camping area.
  • Never park a vehicle over dead grass; the catalytic converter can
  • ignite the vegetation.
    Maintain vehicle brakes, keep tires properly inflated, and shorten tow chains to prevent sparks.
  • Use caution while discharging a firearm, operating an internal combustion engine, welding, or operating acetylene or other torches with an open flame, or using explosives (where permitted).
  • Fireworks are always prohibited on federal lands.

Fire conditions as well as localized closures and restrictions are subject to change. Because tribal, federal, state, and local mandates are different, they may have some differences in their year-round regulations and restriction notices. For a more detailed explanation concerning agency restrictions and fire information, please contact the nearest land management agency office, visit http://wildlandfire.az.gov or call the toll-free Southwest Fire Restrictions Hotline at 1-877-864-6985.


With lofty mountain peaks, forested slopes, seasonal streams, and an amazing variety of plants and wildlife, Madera Canyon has become a popular recreational destination. Madera's hiking trails are applauded throughout the Southwest, and vary from paved, handicap-accessible trails and gentle walking paths in the lower canyon, to steep, expert trails leading to the top of 9,453-foot Mt. Wrightson.

Southeastern Arizona, with Madera Canyon at its heart, is rated the third best birding destination in the United States. With fifteen species of hummingbirds, Elegant Trogon, Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher, Black-capped Gnatcatcher, Flame-colored Tanager, 36 species of wood warblers, and over 256 species of birds documented, it is a "required" site for all serious birders.

It is unusual to spend any time in Madera Canyon without seeing signs of wildlife. White-tailed and Mule Deer, rabbits, Wild Turkeys, and squirrels are regularly observed. Other animals like Black Bear, Coati, foxes, Ring-tailed Cats, Raccoons, Bobcats, and Mountain Lion are more shy and only occasionally seen. Sixteen species of bats have been recorded in the Canyon.

Because Madera Canyon and Madera Creek traverse four life zones and many habitats between the desert floor and the mountaintops, the Santa Rita Mountains in which Madera Canyon resides, has become a world-famous sky island known for its unique and abundant flora and fauna - from Prickly-Pear cactus in the lower Canyon to Douglas Fir and Quaking Aspen on Mt. Wrightson.

Please consider joining the Friends of Madera Canyon. It will provide you access to many interesting and fulfilling volunteer opportunities, but your best reward will be knowing that you have helped preserve a special piece of our Nation's wilderness habitat.


Interested in Madera Canyon News?

If you'd like news from and about Madera Canyon considering joining our mailing list. It's free of charge, your address is not sold or in any way shared, and every note includes an easy link to unsubscribe.

Click on one of the little orange envelopes to join the Friends of Madera Canyon mailing list.


 

 

 

 

 


Bud Gode Picnic and Monsoon Bug Night Saturday, July 19 from 6:45 PM to 9:30 PM. White House Ramada, Madera Canyon. Details here.

Early Monsoon Nature Walk
Saturday, July 26, 7:30 AM
Proctor Parking Trailhead.
Limit: 10. Advance Sign-Up Required. Details here.

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